Health and Healing Through Culture and Community Part 4

In everything NUIHC does, great emphasis is placed on observing Native traditions. It even occasionally hosts funeral services, most recently for Zachary Bearheels, the mentally ill man tasered and punched multiple times by Omaha police last June before dying in custody.

"We use a spiritual base," Polk said. "We don't deal with religion or denomination – we deal with spirituality. Religion is for people afraid they're going to hell, and spirituality is for people who've been there."

Every effort's made to respect client requests.

"If you want to go to the sweat lodge or have a ceremony with a medicine man or go to a pow-wow, you can do that."

"Definitely, our focus is healthcare, but the connection between cultural activities and being able to identify who you are with how those things affect your health has come more about," Tamayo said. "We're able to do that to address the health issues we're working with.

"We work with Omaha Public Schools and their NICE (Native Indian Centered Education) program on addressing truancy. We help school officials understand sometimes Native students will miss school to participate in traditional practices."

NUIHC works with OPS and other stakeholders on cultural sensitivity to Native mobility and family dynamics that find youth moving from place to place.

"That's very important because we look at that as a protective factor so kids can feel good about who they are,” said Polk.

Tamayo appreciates the autonomy she's given.

"Donna (Polk) has faith in me that I understand our families' needs and what services to give them. I have full permission. It's like open-door mentoring. We have to be really connected and visible in the community. It's a lot of hours.

"I've been in the community my whole life on and off and I know most of these families on an individual level, so being able to reach out and do what I need to do to help them is a plus."

That help may include informal counseling-coaching to navigate the complexities of life off the Rez.

"We partner with and reach out to reservations because so many of our families migrate back and forth between urban settings and reservations. We want them to feel like they're getting help with things wherever they go," Tamayo said.

"They feel like they're so far away from home and they don't have a connection here," Polk said. "We help get them more involved in the community so they can keep that cultural connection they may be missing in an urban setting."

Polk feels NUIHC is sometimes out-of-sight, out-of-mind. Its $2.3 million budget depends on the vagaries of federal and foundation funds and grants. The low-key, low-profile agency isn't exactly a household name.

"I don't lament the fact the general public may not know us or what we do here because the people who need our services know we're here. That's what's important to me. Nationally, people know we're here. We get clients from as far away as Alaska who come for treatment."

She's gearing up to raise millions to acquire and renovate the South Omaha Eagles building. Plans to build the Eagle Heights recovery community are contingent on TIF financing and other funding sources.

"Our mission is to create a small community for the original inhabitants of this land. Almost every group has a community people identify with. We believe we can blend in with South Omaha. It offers the land, the vibrancy and a welcoming spirit. We will be able to increase our ability to elevate the health status of urban Indians by offering additional services, including Intensive outpatient, parenting, caregiver training-assistance, community health and outreach."

Visit www.nuihc.com.

 

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.com.
Leo Adam Biga

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