Sowing the Seeds of Giving A New Approach to Addressing Community Needs Is Taking Root As the Public Sector Stumbles

Part 3 in a series

Shaping strategic community goals in partnership with givers is part of the Chamber's mission, said Brown. Everything the Chamber does, he said, is measured.

"We incorporate most of the public and private foundations executive directors and staff into all of our strategic planning processes. We've invited them to be involved in all of our strategic foresight work. On the futurist side, they've been involved in our discussions for our economic development strategy and as issues come up in the community, we find ourselves working on those projects together, too. It's not unusual for the Chamber and several of the foundations and other nonprofit groups to sit around the table with business leaders talking about how to solve a community problem.

"The philanthropic community also tends to be funders of some programs and activities we do. We've been successful in finding those places we have in common and producing something the foundations help fund."

Brown said collaboration comes with the territory, but Omaha does it to an unusual degree.

"A lot of collaboration happens in this community between philanthropists and businesses and the not-for-profit world to see what projects should move forward and which ones maybe not. I think Omaha has collaboration in its DNA. I rarely see an organization stand up and say we are going to work on this project by ourselves and not seek input or not be involved in a strategic discussion about whether it has merit or not.

"When a project doesn't work out, it's usually because collaboration and communication hasn't occurred at the normal level. I think we accomplish more together and that seems to be a common thread I see with most of my colleagues in this community, whether on the business side or the not-for-profit side."

OCF's Boyd said working with partners like the Chamber and United Way helps the foundation "learn what role we can play." She explained, "We're placing some bets on areas where we think, given our history and skills, we might be able to add some value in partnership with things going on in the community."

She said the discussions arising from collaborative meetings help narrow the focus on what the pressing needs are and where best the foundation can help. Another way the foundation gauges what's happening is through the grant application process for its Fund for Omaha. "We see over the period of a couple grant cycles patterns and changes in requests for funding that give us a temperature read on some things moving and changing in the community and what that might mean. It might be emerging needs or gaps of service."

On behalf of donors the foundation has granted $1.5 billion to nonprofits since 1982. In 2016, its donors granted $149 million. Its own Fund for Omaha granted $294,176 in 2016. As of the end of last year, the foundation's assets number just over $1 billion.

The foundation's desire to broaden its work and better measure community needs helped lead to the birth of The Landscape project – a public, data-driven reflection of the community across six areas of community life: Health, Neighborhoods, Safety, Transportation, Workforce and Education.

Those markers largely came out of the community perception or assessment study that OCF did with United Way and Iowa West Foundation.

"There are likely other areas over time we will add to The Landscape," Boyd said.

Landscape information gleaned from experts and residents are available online to anyone at thelandscapeomaha.org

"We wanted more people to participate in some of that thinking and we wanted more people to be able to iterate it," Boyd said, "so having something more publicly available and opening that up for feedback can help those of us who interact on personal levels with different partners and residents in the community."

"We're looking more and more at how we align with some of these issues now spotlighted in The Landscape to try to reach out in new partnerships and new ways. We have a donor base that is community-broad, many of whom are plugging into some of these issues themselves, and we may be able to serve them better in their giving if we're focusing our resources."

Greater impact is the ultimate goal.

"We're hoping the project will assist in bringing some of our philanthropy to another level by infusing more of that curation with the voice of the community – personal stories that add a greater dimension to our understanding. It's not to say by any means the work of the foundation and The Landscape is going to be the thing that leads to change. It has to be efforts we all pursue. This just happens to be our particular part we feel we can play in conversation and interaction with all of the other people invested in moving these issues forward in our community."

She and her colleagues are trying to find ways to get millennials to donate. The foundation's found success doing that through its Omaha Gives campaign.

Increasingly, Boyd said, "we work to be an organization more inclusive of lots of different people and interests in the community, I think we're continuing to build different relationships and find new ways to partner with people who care and want to invest resources."

Boyd, Forsberg and Brown are aware Omaha's legendary giving is generational. While wealth will change hands, they say local philanthropists have been mindful creating instruments to ensure future giving.

Read more of Leo Adam Biga's work at leoadambiga.com.
Leo Adam Biga

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